Day 20 and beyond-Cayman Islands to home


Finishing the trip in one last entry.  Why?  Because not much happened that was interesting.  I was still sick with a cold (Cruise Crud #1) and I wasn’t very active.  I surely didn’t feel like writing much.  I did write about the lower deck tour while sick, but it was a real effort.  That whole day I would run up to the lido for food, then retreat to my cabin.

Day 20-Gerorgetown, Cayman Islands.   I woke up sick.  But not too sick to check things out.  We missed out on a nice island tour for a very reasonable price, but I didn’t know if I was up to running around in a rig for two hours.  Looking back, I think it would have been OK, but at the time I didn’t know.  We tendered off the ship…

Lowering the tenders Tender platform

The tender platform being put in place by the crew.  Georgetown doesn’t have a large dock.  There were four ships tendering that morning.

 

Better Ken with 3 ships (1024x683)

 

Nearest to furthest;  Carnival Valor, Carnival Legend, Ryndam.  The Legend arrived late and was still getting the anchor set when Praxy took this photo.  The Seven Seas Navigator was off to the left of this picture.  It looked pretty impressive from the shore, all those ships lined up.  Sometimes there are as many as  seven in this port at one time.  The streets must be full of pale skinned tourists turning red with a sunburn.

Fourth ship (1024x683)

There it is.

Cayman fish (1024x683)

There was a restaurant across the street and a nice area to snorkel.  These large fish were hanging around.  Obviously, the restaurant was feeding them so the snorkelers would have something to look at up close.  This was REAL close.

 

Ken with lizard (1024x683)

Even though I felt poorly, I could easily get a smile on my face for something odd like this.

Pirates on Cayman (1024x683)

Praxy shares rum with the local buccaneers.  The word “buccaneer” came from a native language.  A local indian tribe cooked their food over open would fires, much like the way we barbeque here in the US, the word was something like “bucco”.  The European pirates liked the idea and adopted it.  The pirates then became known as buccaneers.

Us on Cayman (1024x683) (2)

We spent most of the morning sitting next to the main road along the ocean, watching the people and the traffic.  This sign was across the street, some friends we met on the ship took this picture.  Shortly after this we returned to the ship, I was getting pretty tired.

We took off for Tampa and come across some of the roughest waves of the trip.  There were a lot of people hiding in their cabins sick.  Praxy got a little sick as well.  But I didn’t, at least I didn’t get seasick.  Getting food on the lido was an adventure, people staggering everywhere.  Too bad I couldn’t drink.  Getting drunk of a heaving deck might cancel each other out; meaning a person could walk strait.

I saved up some energy for dinner that night.  The last night of a cruise is usually steak and lobster.  And it was.  I had prime rib and lobster, Praxy just had a lobster.  They were good Maine lobsters and quite tasty.  And Holland America will still give you a second lobster at no extra charge.  Most other cruise lines charge $7 more each.  I doubt if Holland will be able to offer this much longer.  And no, I didn’t have a second one.  One was plenty with the prime rib.

The waves were particularly bad the next morning as we rounded the tip of Cuba.  People were starting to gripe a bit.  The captain came on the intercom and mentioned that it should get better when we neared Florida.  He was correct.  By noon things had calmed down.  That last day was a sea day, I mainly lounged around trying to get better.  Praxy spent a lot of time going from activity to activity.  She danced, went to a cooking demo, and danced again.

We arrived the next morning in Tampa on time.  Got off the ship at 8:45am.  Through customs in 5 minutes.  Caught our return van to the airport and we were on the road by 9am.  Flight out of Tampa, on time at noon.  Flight out of Minneapolis, on time at 5:30pm.  Good weather in Spokane, Leslie picked us up after a 10 minute wait.

I mentioned the above because events usually don’t go that smoothly in the winter.  In fact, we hardly had a glitch the whole trip.  Amazing.  I planned our trip out carefully and our vacation went almost to scrip.  If we had been a few days later, it may have been chaos for us.  It’s the 27th of December and people are having trouble traveling all over the eastern half of the country.

Lucky us.

We did have a good snowstorm going near Spokane.  The first half of our trip was slow going with 1-2 inches of snow on the road.  We got out of it, though and had a nice ride back.

Oh yeah, Cruise Crud #1 is respiratory.  Cruise Crud #2 is just that.  You can’t stop going number 2.  Praxy has been sick the last few days, unfortunately.  She caught my cold and has spent a lot of time sleeping it off.

There were a lot of people sick by the end of the 14 day segment of the cruise.  This seems to be an ongoing problem in the industry.   Lucky for all of us, the problems on the Ryndam were mostly limited to a bad head cold.  One of the employees came down with a very high fever, but he was back to work in three days.  Several passengers were restricted to their quarters with a fever as well.  I had a very high fever until I doctored the nasty sinus infection I’d given myself while snorkeling.  It was gone the next morning or I would have stayed in my cabin for the end of the cruise.

I’m not done yet, I still have a little more to write about.  It doesn’t seem to fit in this post, so I’ll put up another in a bit.  Odds and ends.

12/27/12 noon

 

 

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About Ken

I am a federal employee that loves to travel. I don't get any time off during the busy salmon tagging season, March through November. So, I save my leave and explore the warmer parts of the world during the winter.
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